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Published on2023-05-08Views:305
SIZE MATTERS: CALLIGRAPHY FOR PUBLIC VIEWING
SIZE MATTERS: CALLIGRAPHY FOR PUBLIC VIEWING
SIZE MATTERS: CALLIGRAPHY FOR PUBLIC VIEWING

SIZE MATTERS: CALLIGRAPHY FOR PUBLIC VIEWING

Dates
2023/05/27 - 2023/07/24
Venue
Hengshan Calligraphy Art Center
Overview

Size Matters: Calligraphy for Public Viewing

This exhibition is organized by joint curation between the Taoyuan Museum of Fine Arts and the National Museum of History (NMH), which is the second collaboration since 2022. Artifacts from NMH's collection and ink rubbings from private collectors are showcased alongside commissioned bangshu (large-character calligraphy) artworks by calligraphers nowadays. This exhibition takes a historical perspective to review the context of bangshu while incorporating contemporary interpretations by contemporary calligraphers. Through the open displaying gallery in the HCAC, dialogue is fostered to show various aspects and potentials of bangshu creation.

Curator:TSAI Yao-ching、LIN Chia-ying

Overview

The terms of large-character calligraphy have shown in Chinese literature across the ages including shushu (署書), bokeshu (擘窠書), and bangshu (榜書). They appeared in the following chronological order: the term shushu was used as early as the Qin dynasty; bokeshu most likely originated between the Tang and Song dynasties; and bangshu only came into usage during the Ming and Qing dynasties. On a closer look, there are slight differences between the three: shushu refers to all sorts of inscriptions and signatures regardless of character size; Bokeshu indicates every form of large-character calligraphy including shushu. Only in the Qing era did Kang Youwei make the term bangshu equivalent to shushu and bokeshu, making all large-character calligraphy commonly called bangshu nowadays.

As a form of calligraphic expression, bangshu possesses a grand scale and imposing momentum. While beauty is not solely determined by size, the magnified characters of bangshu are filled with essence, vitality, and spirit, which can always inspire and energize people. Looking down at the signs of local shops and famous historical sites, bangshu is present in the scenes of our daily lives. Other than the domestic space, larger works are needed to provide a majestic aesthetic effect to meet visual expectations in the public space of modern buildings. This is precisely why bangshu deserves attention and recognition today.

This exhibition attempts to discuss the functionality and practicality of bangshu from a historical perspective. The changing process of the term bangshu is reviewed through the ink rubbings and surviving large characters works. In addition, the bangshu creations of modern calligraphers, such as Luo Huai-jan, Su Shi-jie,Fu Chuan-fu, Lee Ku-mo, Tong Yang-tze, Quenten Lee, Lin Long-dar, Chen Hung-mien, Chu Hsiu-ying, Hsueh Chih-yang, Huang Po-szu, Liu Kuang-yi, and Wang Yi-chun, are displayed to showcase the transformation and inheritance of bangshu, and to allow visitors to experience the special charm of large-character calligraphy.

SIZE MATTERS: CALLIGRAPHY FOR PUBLIC VIEWING
SIZE MATTERS: CALLIGRAPHY FOR PUBLIC VIEWING
Last updated on2024-02-27